You Can Help Save America’s National Treasures—Take Action Today! | UNCF

You Can Help Save America’s National Treasures—Take Action Today!

Let your members of Congress know the importance of preserving HBCUs.

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are America’s national treasures. This network of more than 100 historic institutions established as early as 1837 for former slaves and freedmen contain repositories of important books, papers and memorabilia of black history. In addition, HBCUs served as meeting places during the civil rights struggles of the 1900s.

Against substantial odds, HBCUs have played a unique role in transforming the landscape of higher education in the United States and continue to prepare the African American professional and civic leaders needed by communities, employers and the United States. 


TAKE ACTION—CONTACT YOUR SENATOR TODAY


The U.S. House unanimously passed H.R. 1135, a bill sponsored by Congressman James E. Clyburn that reauthorizes $10 million annually through 2023 for the HBCUs Historic Preservation Program.  Now we need the Senate to pass  their version of the bill and support at least a $5 million appropriation in the final FY 2018 budget. 

UNCF is calling on HBCU alumni, supporters and advocates to e-mail or tweet your Senators today, and ask them to fund the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Historic Preservation Program—a federal grant program that could help save over 700 historic properties on HBCU campuses. Plan to take action by urging your Senators to #PreserveHBCUs. >> Read more

 

Did You Know?

  • HBCUs were designated as one of the nation's 11 most endangered historic sites by the National Trust for Historic Places.
  • A 1998 government study estimated $755 million was needed to restore 712 historic properties on HBCU campuses.
  • Since 1996, 59 HBCUs in 20 states have received only $60 million in federal funding through the HBCU Historic Preservation Program.
  • There are more than 100 HBCUs, established as early as 1837 for former slaves and freedman. 
  • HBCUs served as meeting places during the civil rights struggles of the 1900s and contain repositories of important books, papers and memorabilia of black history.
  • Congress created the HBCU Historic Preservation Program in 1998.

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