Perceptions: The African American Community’s Views on K-12 Education

The United States is experiencing a crisis in the education for Black students. Various data show that deep disparities exist not only in outcomes, but in opportunities provided to students of color. UNCF has been working to address these issues, but we didn’t want to take on this task without first hearing from important stakeholders—the African American community itself.

To that end, UNCF is working to amplify the voices that are often overlooked in education discussions with our African American perceptions research series. This groundbreaking three-part series of in-depth reports uplifts the voices of African American parents, community leaders, and youth because we know that the African American voices have and always will matter in education policy. The Perceptions Research Series creates the impetus for concrete action and challenges readers to confront assumptions about apathy among the African American community on important issues like education. 

Research suggests that students who are more engaged and more optimistic about education are more likely to aspire to attend college.

Dr. Michael L. Lomax

UNCF's K-12 Research


As the nation's largest and most effective minority education organization, UNCF has always been committed to increasing the number of African American college graduates. Now, we have expanded our focus to include increasing the number of African Americans who are college-ready.

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Student Voices Matter


Meredith B.L. Anderson, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute at UNCF, discusses “A Seat at the Table”, the final installment in UNCF's three-part series on African American perspectives on education, The Perceptions Research series. The article addresses students' perceptions of the US K-12 education system. Originally published by the Brookings Institute.

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